When All I Want is a Sabbath

I was optimistic in August when the Urbana blogger application opened. I had a few spare hours in my days, I knew I had a lot to think about and process this semester, and I figured having a blog post due every week would force me to take time to be reflective about God’s work in my life. I wanted to use blogging as a part of my Sabbath – a time to be still and know that God is God.

I hoped to spend an hour or two on Sunday afternoons thinking back over my week and how God had meet me. I imagined that blogging as Sabbath would be consistent and restful.

It’s November, and reality has set in. “Remember the Sabbath day” has been drowned out by people and projects and planning until I am practically screaming from the inside – “Give me a day to rest!”

“Remember the Sabbath day” has been drowned out by people and projects and planning until I am practically screaming from the inside – “Give me a day to rest!”

I just need a day to get my thoughts in order. I need some time to process what has happened. I need a Sabbath. So I’m blogging.

I am taking the opportunity to image God, to remember what he did during the creation of the world when he stopped to rest and to look at his good creation (Genesis 2:1-3, Exodus 20:8-11).

I am using my morning to tell the story of how God brought his people from a life of endless work and pain into rest in the promised land, and how he promises to bring us into eternal life in his kingdom (Deuteronomy 5:12-15).

I am saying to myself, Jesus is enough. If I am not working this morning, if I just sit and think and write and pray, that is okay. I can never be enough through my own work, though I labor all seven days of the week, but Jesus has already done what must be accomplished.

Today, I am accepting Jesus’ invitation from Matthew 11, “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.”

Three readings on the Sabbath which challenged me this past weekend at an InterVarsity Fall Retreat.

Thus the heavens and the earth were completed in all their vast array.

By the seventh day God had finished the work he had been doing; so on the seventh day he rested from all his work. Then God blessed the seventh day and made it holy, because on it he rested from all the work of creating that he had done.

Genesis 2:1-3

Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor, and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God. On it you shall not do any work, you, or your son, or your daughter, your male servant, or your female servant, or your livestock, or the sojourner who is within your gates. For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy.

Exodus 20:8-11

Observe the Sabbath day by keeping it holy, as the Lord your God has commanded you. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a sabbath to the Lord your God. On it you shall not do any work, neither you, nor your son or daughter, nor your male or female servant, nor your ox, your donkey or any of your animals, nor any foreigner residing in your towns, so that your male and female servants may rest, as you do. Remember that you were slaves in Egypt and that the Lord your God brought you out of there with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm. Therefore the Lord your God has commanded you to observe the Sabbath day.

Deuteronomy 5:12-15

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